Christians, Jeshuaists, Jews, Le'bnsshpil = lifestyle - way of life, Life matters, Moslims of Islamieten, Re-blogs and Thoughts of others, Religiosity + Way of Expressing Faith, Surveys - Polls

We Count. We Just Weren’t Counted.

Susan Katz Miller is the author of The Interfaith Family Journal and Being Both: Embracing Two Religions in One Interfaith FamilyHer original surveys of multiple religious practitioners in US interfaith families are often cited in the academic literature. A former correspondent for Newsweek and New Scientist, she has spoken on interfaith families at The Parliament of the World’s Religions, the Unitarian Universalist General Assembly, The Wild Goose Festival, and many other venues. Find her at susankatzmiller.com or on twitter @susankatzmiller.

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In Judaism and Jeshuaism there have always been two opposite views on interfaith relationships. All groups know having a partnership with someone of another religious system or with a non-religious person makes life more difficult.
Those who are not so against intermarriage and would allow such contacts with people of other religious groups, do believe it can enrich both partners and families.

The way people feel about Israel have so much to do with interfaith. Also groups that are keen to be not mixed can take an adverse opinion of Zionists. Look for example to some Haredim.

That the non-Orthodox Jewish world in America now have extended interfaith families, and that they are taking the demographic lead, does not mean that would be to according to the mitzvot. What the opinion might be we always should remember that it is the Elohim Who touches and knows the heart and Who shall be the most righteous Judge.

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Preceding

Intermarriage and Protecting the state of the Jewish and/or Jeshuaist family

Welcoming Interfaith Families, Maintaining Tradition – Eqev 5781

Being Both

More on Pew’s Jewish Americans in 2020

For generations, interfaith families who felt excluded, misunderstood, or disrespected by Jewish clergy or institutions, have found other homes. Some gravitated to Unitarian-Universalism, which draws on many religions. Some added Buddhism, or Sufism, or Paganism, to their spiritual practice. And for more than a quarter of a century now, interfaith families have been building their own dual-practice communities in which to honor both Judaism and Christianity.

But very few of these people with complex religious practices (and I have studied hundreds of them) stopped practicing Judaism altogether, or stopped calling themselves Jews.

The irony is that Jews who did stop practicing Judaism altogether are considered Jewish in the new Pew study of Jewish Americans in 2020, as long as they don’t claim a second religion. But if you claim two religions, you forfeit your right to have Pew consider you part of the…

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